In pics: Men who embarrassed cricket | GoCricket.com
 
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In pics: Men who embarrassed cricket

New Zealand's Lou Vincent has been banned for life by the ECB after he admitted breaching the the cricket board's anti-corruption regulations. Hours before the penalty was announced, Vincent released a statement saying that he was a cheat and that he had accepted money to under-perform.
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Salman Butt was jailed in England after a London court found him guilty of spot-fixing in 2011. Butt was captain of the Pakistan team in 2010 when the erstwhile newspaper News of the World revealed how bookie Majid Menon colluded with him so that Mohammad Amir can bowl no balls. Butt was sentenced to 30 months in jail and ICC imposed a ten-year ban on the player.
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Mohammad Amir was the youngest member in Pakistan's troika that was found guilty after News of the World expose. In February 2011 he was handed a five-year ban following investigations by an ICC tribunal. He pleaded guilty to the charges and was sentenced to six months in prison by a London court.
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Valuable addition in Pakistan's rich line of fast bowlers, Mohammad Asif was charged for bowling pre-planned no balls during Pakistan's tour of England in 2010. The ICC banned him for seven years after the charges of spot-fixing were proved. The trial took place in London and Asif was eventually sent to jail for a year.
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Shanthakumaran Sreesanth was among three Rajasthan Royals players arrested in May 2013, along with Ajit Chandila and Ankeet Chavan, for the alleged links with bookmakers in the IPL. The BCCI's disciplinary committee found him guilty of spot-fixing and banned him for life.
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Salim Malik was the first international cricketer to be banned - from all forms of cricket - for match-fixing, when Justice Qayyum's inquiry found him guilty. Shane Warne and Mark Waugh also testified that Malik had tried to bribe them to lose the Karachi Test of 1994-95 (which Australia did, by one wicket). A Pakistan court later overturned his life ban.
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Many believe that Hansie Cronje and Mohammad Azharuddin were exposed by chance. Azhar and Cronje were the two most high-profile names to be banned for life since 2000. The wristy Hyderabadi though got his life ban overturned as the Andhra Pradesh High Court found the ban "illegal and unsustainable." Ajay Jadeja was also handed a five-year ban which subsequently was quashed.
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His name cropped up in the Hansie Cronje trial. Herschelle Gibbs along with pacer Henry Williams was handed a six-month ban from cricket. Gibbs later made a comeback and was never reported again.
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The issue came to light when Delhi Police charged Cronje with fixing an ODI against India in 2000. Cronje confided to Ali Bacher, Cricket South Africa's then managing director of his involvement. He accepted taking money for some forecasts but not match-fixing. However, Gibbs later accepted that he took $15000 from his captain for losing a match against India. Two years later, Hansie died in a plane crash.
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The newspapers reactions after Cronje admitted of his involvement sums up the feeling.
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New Zealand's Lou Vincent has been banned for life by the ECB after he admitted breaching the the cricket board's anti-corruption regulations. Hours before the penalty was announced, Vincent released a statement saying that he was a cheat and that he had accepted money to under-perform.